ADF&G releases new Pacific Salmon Treaty language

Juneau, Alaska (KINY) - With implementation poised to begin Jan.1, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game have released three chapters of new Pacific Salmon Treaty language.

Three chapters will directly impact Alaska and Alaskans.

The current chapters of the Pacific Salmon Treaty expire Dec. 31. Over the past several years a team of 58 Alaskans including department staff and affected users have been working towards negotiating a new agreement. In June 2018, the Pacific Salmon Commission completed negotiations regarding a new conservation and harvest sharing agreement between the United States and Canada. This new agreement forms the basis for management of southeast Alaska salmon fisheries.

The revised agreement addresses a number of salmon fisheries in southeast Alaska, including those near the Alaska/British Columbia border and on several transboundary rivers.  

New treaty language for the primary chapters that affect Southeast Alaska are available at:

• Chapter 1:  Transboundary Rivers - http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/home/news/hottopics/pdfs/2019_pst_chp_1_transboundary_rivers.pdf
• Chapter 2:  Northern British Columbia and Southeastern Alaska- http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/home/news/hottopics/pdfs/2019_pst_chp_2_northern_boundary.pdf
• Chapter 3: Chinook Salmon - http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/home/news/hottopics/pdfs/2019_pst_chp_3_chinook_salmon.pdf

The Pacific Salmon Treaty provides for the conservation and management of salmon that span the international borders between the U.S. and Canada. Since its ratification in 1985, the treaty has been instrumental in reducing interceptions, preventing overfishing and improving salmon management.

In the upcoming months the department will be releasing its 2019 forecast and management regime for southeast Alaska fisheries under this agreement.  

 

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